White Cells Facilitate Opposite- and Same-Sex Mating of Opaque Cells in


In eukaryotic organisms, cells often undergo differentiation into distinct cell types in order to fulfill specialized roles. To achieve a certain function, different cell types may behave coordinately to complete a task that they may otherwise be incapable of completing independently. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can exist as two functionally and morphologically distinct cell types: white and opaque. The white cell type is thought to be the default state and may be the majority cell population in nature. However, only the minority opaque cells are mating-competent. In this study, we report that white and opaque cells show a coordinated behavior in the process of mating. When in the presence of opaque cells with an opposite mating type, white cells release sexual pheromones, and thus create an environment conducive for both opposite- and same-sex mating of opaque cells. The two cell types communicate via a paracrine pheromone signaling system. We propose that this communal coordination between white and opaque cells may not only support the fungus to be a successful commensal and pathogen in the host, but may also increase the fitness of the fungus during evolution over time.


Vyšlo v časopise: White Cells Facilitate Opposite- and Same-Sex Mating of Opaque Cells in. PLoS Genet 10(10): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004737
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004737

Souhrn

In eukaryotic organisms, cells often undergo differentiation into distinct cell types in order to fulfill specialized roles. To achieve a certain function, different cell types may behave coordinately to complete a task that they may otherwise be incapable of completing independently. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can exist as two functionally and morphologically distinct cell types: white and opaque. The white cell type is thought to be the default state and may be the majority cell population in nature. However, only the minority opaque cells are mating-competent. In this study, we report that white and opaque cells show a coordinated behavior in the process of mating. When in the presence of opaque cells with an opposite mating type, white cells release sexual pheromones, and thus create an environment conducive for both opposite- and same-sex mating of opaque cells. The two cell types communicate via a paracrine pheromone signaling system. We propose that this communal coordination between white and opaque cells may not only support the fungus to be a successful commensal and pathogen in the host, but may also increase the fitness of the fungus during evolution over time.


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Genetika Reprodukčná medicína

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