Systematic Analysis of ZnCys Transcription Factors Required for Development and Pathogenicity by High-Throughput Gene Knockout in the Rice Blast Fungus


Magnaporthe oryzae is not only the fungus causing the rice blast disease, which leads to 20–30% losses in rice production, but also a primary model pathosystem for understanding host-pathogen interactions. However, there is no high-throughput gene knockout system constructed, and little is known about most of the genes in this fungus. We developed a high-throughput gene knockout system, and using this system, we obtained null mutants of 104 fungal-specific Zn2Cys6 transcription factor (TF) genes by screening 8741 primary transformants in M. oryzae. We analyzed the functions of these TF genes in development, pathogenesis, and stress responses under 9 conditions. We found that 61 Zn2Cys6 TF genes play indispensable and diversified roles in fungal development and pathogenicity. CNF1 is the first reported TF gene that strongly and negatively regulates asexual development in the rice blast fungus, and CCA1, CNF1, CNF2, CONx1, GPF1, GTA1, MoCOD1 and PCF1 are required for pathogenicity. We further found via RNA-seq that GPF1 and CNF2 have similar mechanisms in gene expression regulation related to pathogenicity. The resulting data provide new insights into how Zn2Cys6 TF genes regulate important traits during the infection cycle of this rice blast pathogen.


Vyšlo v časopise: Systematic Analysis of ZnCys Transcription Factors Required for Development and Pathogenicity by High-Throughput Gene Knockout in the Rice Blast Fungus. PLoS Pathog 10(10): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004432
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1004432

Souhrn

Magnaporthe oryzae is not only the fungus causing the rice blast disease, which leads to 20–30% losses in rice production, but also a primary model pathosystem for understanding host-pathogen interactions. However, there is no high-throughput gene knockout system constructed, and little is known about most of the genes in this fungus. We developed a high-throughput gene knockout system, and using this system, we obtained null mutants of 104 fungal-specific Zn2Cys6 transcription factor (TF) genes by screening 8741 primary transformants in M. oryzae. We analyzed the functions of these TF genes in development, pathogenesis, and stress responses under 9 conditions. We found that 61 Zn2Cys6 TF genes play indispensable and diversified roles in fungal development and pathogenicity. CNF1 is the first reported TF gene that strongly and negatively regulates asexual development in the rice blast fungus, and CCA1, CNF1, CNF2, CONx1, GPF1, GTA1, MoCOD1 and PCF1 are required for pathogenicity. We further found via RNA-seq that GPF1 and CNF2 have similar mechanisms in gene expression regulation related to pathogenicity. The resulting data provide new insights into how Zn2Cys6 TF genes regulate important traits during the infection cycle of this rice blast pathogen.


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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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