Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity


There is an urgent need to better understand how to reliably generate effective vaccines, particularly subunit vaccines, as certain pathogens are considered to pose too great of a safety risk to be developed as live, attenuated or killed vaccines (e.g., HIV-1). The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are two of the most effective subunit vaccines ever developed and have continued to show protection against HPV associated disease up to and beyond five years post-vaccination. Moreover, the target population for these vaccines have essentially no pre-existing immunity to the HPV types covered by the vaccine; therefore, these vaccines provide an excellent model for studying the immunity elicited by a highly effective subunit vaccine. As the HPV vaccines, like most vaccines, protect by generating antibodies, we are interested in characterizing the memory B cells elicited by the HPV vaccine. Memory B cells help to sustain antibody levels over time by rapidly differentiating into antibody secreting cells upon pathogen re-exposure. Although previous studies have provided evidence that the HPV vaccines elicit memory B cells, they did not characterize these cells. Here, we have isolated HPV-specific memory B cells from adolescent females and women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and have cloned antibodies from these cells. Importantly, we find that these antibodies potently inhibit HPV and that the memory B cells from which they derive exhibit hallmarks of long-lived memory B cells.


Vyšlo v časopise: Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity. PLoS Pathog 10(10): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004461
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1004461

Souhrn

There is an urgent need to better understand how to reliably generate effective vaccines, particularly subunit vaccines, as certain pathogens are considered to pose too great of a safety risk to be developed as live, attenuated or killed vaccines (e.g., HIV-1). The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are two of the most effective subunit vaccines ever developed and have continued to show protection against HPV associated disease up to and beyond five years post-vaccination. Moreover, the target population for these vaccines have essentially no pre-existing immunity to the HPV types covered by the vaccine; therefore, these vaccines provide an excellent model for studying the immunity elicited by a highly effective subunit vaccine. As the HPV vaccines, like most vaccines, protect by generating antibodies, we are interested in characterizing the memory B cells elicited by the HPV vaccine. Memory B cells help to sustain antibody levels over time by rapidly differentiating into antibody secreting cells upon pathogen re-exposure. Although previous studies have provided evidence that the HPV vaccines elicit memory B cells, they did not characterize these cells. Here, we have isolated HPV-specific memory B cells from adolescent females and women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and have cloned antibodies from these cells. Importantly, we find that these antibodies potently inhibit HPV and that the memory B cells from which they derive exhibit hallmarks of long-lived memory B cells.


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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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