Glutamate Secretion and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 Expression during Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Promotes Cell Proliferation


Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV), prevalent in immunosuppressed HIV infected individuals and transplant recipients, is etiologically associated with cancers such as endothelial Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and B-cell primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). Both KS and PEL develop from the unlimited proliferation of KSHV infected cells. Increased secretion of various host cytokines and growth factors, and the activation of their corresponding receptors, are shown to be contributing to the proliferation of KSHV latently infected cells. Glutamate, a neurotransmitter, is also involved in several cellular events including cell proliferation. In the present study, we report that KSHV-infected latent cells induce the secretion of glutamate and activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), and KSHV latency associated LANA-1 and Kaposin A proteins are involved in glutaminase and mGluR1 expression. Our functional analysis showed that elevated secretion of glutamate and mGluR1 activation is linked to increased proliferation of KSHV infected cells and glutamate release inhibitor and glutamate receptor antagonists blocked the proliferation of KSHV infected cells. These studies show that proliferation of cancer cells latently infected with KSHV in part depends upon glutamate and glutamate receptor and therefore could potentially be used as therapeutic targets for the control and elimination of KSHV associated cancers.


Vyšlo v časopise: Glutamate Secretion and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 Expression during Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Promotes Cell Proliferation. PLoS Pathog 10(10): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004389
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004389

Souhrn

Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV), prevalent in immunosuppressed HIV infected individuals and transplant recipients, is etiologically associated with cancers such as endothelial Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and B-cell primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). Both KS and PEL develop from the unlimited proliferation of KSHV infected cells. Increased secretion of various host cytokines and growth factors, and the activation of their corresponding receptors, are shown to be contributing to the proliferation of KSHV latently infected cells. Glutamate, a neurotransmitter, is also involved in several cellular events including cell proliferation. In the present study, we report that KSHV-infected latent cells induce the secretion of glutamate and activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), and KSHV latency associated LANA-1 and Kaposin A proteins are involved in glutaminase and mGluR1 expression. Our functional analysis showed that elevated secretion of glutamate and mGluR1 activation is linked to increased proliferation of KSHV infected cells and glutamate release inhibitor and glutamate receptor antagonists blocked the proliferation of KSHV infected cells. These studies show that proliferation of cancer cells latently infected with KSHV in part depends upon glutamate and glutamate receptor and therefore could potentially be used as therapeutic targets for the control and elimination of KSHV associated cancers.


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