SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation


Characterization of Lotus japonicus mutants defective for nodule infection by rhizobia led to the identification of a gene we named SCARN. Two of the five alleles caused formation of branched root-hairs in uninoculated seedlings, suggesting SCARN plays a role in the microtubule and actin-regulated polar growth of root hairs. SCARN is one of three L. japonicus proteins containing the conserved N and C terminal domains predicted to be required for rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. SCARN expression is induced in response to rhizobial nodulation factors by the NIN (NODULE INCEPTION) transcription factor and appears to be adapted to promoting rhizobial infection, possibly arising from a gene duplication event. SCARN binds to ARPC3, one of the predicted components in the actin-related protein complex involved in the activation of actin nucleation.


Vyšlo v časopise: SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation. PLoS Genet 11(10): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005623
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005623

Souhrn

Characterization of Lotus japonicus mutants defective for nodule infection by rhizobia led to the identification of a gene we named SCARN. Two of the five alleles caused formation of branched root-hairs in uninoculated seedlings, suggesting SCARN plays a role in the microtubule and actin-regulated polar growth of root hairs. SCARN is one of three L. japonicus proteins containing the conserved N and C terminal domains predicted to be required for rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. SCARN expression is induced in response to rhizobial nodulation factors by the NIN (NODULE INCEPTION) transcription factor and appears to be adapted to promoting rhizobial infection, possibly arising from a gene duplication event. SCARN binds to ARPC3, one of the predicted components in the actin-related protein complex involved in the activation of actin nucleation.


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