UVB Induces a Genome-Wide Acting Negative Regulatory Mechanism That Operates at the Level of Transcription Initiation in Human Cells


Our genome is continuously exposed to genotoxic attacks that generate aberrant DNA structures. These can block the transcribing DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (Pol II) enzyme and can lead to deleterious cellular processes. Cells have developed several mechanisms to stop Pol II, repair the roadblocks and to restore normal polymerase traffic. Numerous efforts investigated the fate of blocked Pol II during DNA repair mechanisms and suggested that stopped Pol II complexes can either backtrack, be removed or bypass the lesions to allow repair. We carried out a genome-wide analysis of Pol II behavior upon a DNA damaging stress, UVB, which is relevant from the public health standpoint. Thus, we could follow UVB-induced Pol II behavior changes on every human gene over time. We uncovered a novel UV induced negative regulatory mechanism, which inhibits the recruitment of Pol II to the promoters of about 93% of all transcribed genes, and a small subset of gene (including regulators of repair, cell growth and survival) that escapes this negative regulation, probably because their gene products are required during/after UVB irradiation. Thus, we uncover how a cell induces a global negative regulation at the level of transcription initiation in response to a genotoxic stress.


Vyšlo v časopise: UVB Induces a Genome-Wide Acting Negative Regulatory Mechanism That Operates at the Level of Transcription Initiation in Human Cells. PLoS Genet 10(7): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004483
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004483

Souhrn

Our genome is continuously exposed to genotoxic attacks that generate aberrant DNA structures. These can block the transcribing DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (Pol II) enzyme and can lead to deleterious cellular processes. Cells have developed several mechanisms to stop Pol II, repair the roadblocks and to restore normal polymerase traffic. Numerous efforts investigated the fate of blocked Pol II during DNA repair mechanisms and suggested that stopped Pol II complexes can either backtrack, be removed or bypass the lesions to allow repair. We carried out a genome-wide analysis of Pol II behavior upon a DNA damaging stress, UVB, which is relevant from the public health standpoint. Thus, we could follow UVB-induced Pol II behavior changes on every human gene over time. We uncovered a novel UV induced negative regulatory mechanism, which inhibits the recruitment of Pol II to the promoters of about 93% of all transcribed genes, and a small subset of gene (including regulators of repair, cell growth and survival) that escapes this negative regulation, probably because their gene products are required during/after UVB irradiation. Thus, we uncover how a cell induces a global negative regulation at the level of transcription initiation in response to a genotoxic stress.


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