Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate


Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable efforts genetic studies have yet to reveal the precise genetic underpinnings of the disorder. In this study we have analyzed a large extended pedigree of Old Order Amish that segregates bipolar disorder. Our study design integrates both dense genotype and whole-genome sequence data. In a combined linkage and association analysis we identify five chromosomal regions with nominally significant or suggestive evidence for linkage, several of which constitute replication of earlier linkage findings for bipolar disorder in non-Amish families. Association analysis of genetic variants in each of the linkage regions yielded a number of plausible candidate genes for bipolar disorder. The striking genetic heterogeneity we observed in this genetic isolate has profound implications for the study of bipolar disorder in the general population.


Vyšlo v časopise: Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate. PLoS Genet 10(3): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004229
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004229

Souhrn

Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable efforts genetic studies have yet to reveal the precise genetic underpinnings of the disorder. In this study we have analyzed a large extended pedigree of Old Order Amish that segregates bipolar disorder. Our study design integrates both dense genotype and whole-genome sequence data. In a combined linkage and association analysis we identify five chromosomal regions with nominally significant or suggestive evidence for linkage, several of which constitute replication of earlier linkage findings for bipolar disorder in non-Amish families. Association analysis of genetic variants in each of the linkage regions yielded a number of plausible candidate genes for bipolar disorder. The striking genetic heterogeneity we observed in this genetic isolate has profound implications for the study of bipolar disorder in the general population.


Zdroje

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