Evidence for a Transketolase-Mediated Metabolic Checkpoint Governing Biotrophic Growth in Rice Cells by the Blast Fungus


The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae destroys rice and wheat harvests and could compromise global food security. Following penetration into the rice cell, M. oryzae elaborates bulbous invasive hyphae that grow in living rice cells for most of the infection cycle without causing disease symptoms. Little is known about the physiological processes governing this important biotrophic stage of fungal growth. Here, we used gene functional analysis to show how the primary metabolic enzyme transketolase is essential for hyphal growth in rice cells. Loss of transketolase did not affect the ability of the fungus to gain entry into rice cells, but invasive hyphal growth was curtailed in transketolase null mutants. Biotrophic growth was restored in transketolase mutants by the addition of exogenous ATP. We conclude that M. oryzae metabolism is dedicated to metabolizing glucose through transketolase in planta in order to provide ATP as a trigger for biotrophic growth and infection. This work is significant because it reveals important—but previously unknown—metabolic strategies employed by M. oryzae to facilitate rice infection. These strategies might be open to abrogation by chemical or biological means and are likely relevant to other rapidly proliferating intracellular pathogens.


Vyšlo v časopise: Evidence for a Transketolase-Mediated Metabolic Checkpoint Governing Biotrophic Growth in Rice Cells by the Blast Fungus. PLoS Pathog 10(9): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004354
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004354

Souhrn

The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae destroys rice and wheat harvests and could compromise global food security. Following penetration into the rice cell, M. oryzae elaborates bulbous invasive hyphae that grow in living rice cells for most of the infection cycle without causing disease symptoms. Little is known about the physiological processes governing this important biotrophic stage of fungal growth. Here, we used gene functional analysis to show how the primary metabolic enzyme transketolase is essential for hyphal growth in rice cells. Loss of transketolase did not affect the ability of the fungus to gain entry into rice cells, but invasive hyphal growth was curtailed in transketolase null mutants. Biotrophic growth was restored in transketolase mutants by the addition of exogenous ATP. We conclude that M. oryzae metabolism is dedicated to metabolizing glucose through transketolase in planta in order to provide ATP as a trigger for biotrophic growth and infection. This work is significant because it reveals important—but previously unknown—metabolic strategies employed by M. oryzae to facilitate rice infection. These strategies might be open to abrogation by chemical or biological means and are likely relevant to other rapidly proliferating intracellular pathogens.


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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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