The Lysine Acetyltransferase Activator Brpf1 Governs Dentate Gyrus Development through Neural Stem Cells and Progenitors


Lysine acetylation refers to addition of the acetyl group to lysine residues after protein synthesis. Little is known about how this modification plays a role in the brain and neural stem cells. It is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as lysine acetyltransferases. A novel epigenetic regulator called BRPF1 acts as a master activator of three different lysine acetyltransferases and also contains multiple structural domains for histone binding. In this study, we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes abnormal development of the dentate gyrus, a key component of the hippocampus. We trace the developmental origin to compromised neural stem cells and progenitors, and demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration and cell cycle progression during development of the dentate gyrus. This is the first report on an epigenetic regulator whose loss has such a profound impact on the hippocampus, especially the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.


Vyšlo v časopise: The Lysine Acetyltransferase Activator Brpf1 Governs Dentate Gyrus Development through Neural Stem Cells and Progenitors. PLoS Genet 11(3): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005034
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005034

Souhrn

Lysine acetylation refers to addition of the acetyl group to lysine residues after protein synthesis. Little is known about how this modification plays a role in the brain and neural stem cells. It is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as lysine acetyltransferases. A novel epigenetic regulator called BRPF1 acts as a master activator of three different lysine acetyltransferases and also contains multiple structural domains for histone binding. In this study, we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes abnormal development of the dentate gyrus, a key component of the hippocampus. We trace the developmental origin to compromised neural stem cells and progenitors, and demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration and cell cycle progression during development of the dentate gyrus. This is the first report on an epigenetic regulator whose loss has such a profound impact on the hippocampus, especially the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.


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