Asymmetric Division and Differential Gene Expression during a Bacterial Developmental Program Requires DivIVA


A central feature of developmental programs is the establishment of asymmetry and the production of genetically identical daughter cells that display different cell fates. Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a simple developmental program in which the cell divides asymmetrically to produce two daughter cells, after which the transcription factor σF is activated specifically in the smaller cell. Here we investigated DivIVA, which localizes to highly negatively curved membranes, and discovered that it localizes at the asymmetric division site. In the absence of DivIVA, cells failed to asymmetrically divide and prematurely activated σF in the predivisional cell, largely unreported phenotypes for any deletion mutant in a sporulation gene. We found that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE, a protein that is required for asymmetric division and σF activation, and that both proteins preferentially localize on the side of the septum facing the smaller daughter cell. DivIVA is therefore a previously overlooked structural factor that is required at the onset of sporulation to mediate both asymmetric division and compartment-specific transcription.


Vyšlo v časopise: Asymmetric Division and Differential Gene Expression during a Bacterial Developmental Program Requires DivIVA. PLoS Genet 10(8): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004526
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004526

Souhrn

A central feature of developmental programs is the establishment of asymmetry and the production of genetically identical daughter cells that display different cell fates. Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a simple developmental program in which the cell divides asymmetrically to produce two daughter cells, after which the transcription factor σF is activated specifically in the smaller cell. Here we investigated DivIVA, which localizes to highly negatively curved membranes, and discovered that it localizes at the asymmetric division site. In the absence of DivIVA, cells failed to asymmetrically divide and prematurely activated σF in the predivisional cell, largely unreported phenotypes for any deletion mutant in a sporulation gene. We found that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE, a protein that is required for asymmetric division and σF activation, and that both proteins preferentially localize on the side of the septum facing the smaller daughter cell. DivIVA is therefore a previously overlooked structural factor that is required at the onset of sporulation to mediate both asymmetric division and compartment-specific transcription.


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