Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection


Proteins are subject to many types of modification that regulate their functions and which are applied after their initial synthesis in the cell. One such modification is known as sumoylation, the covalent linkage of a small ubiquitin-like protein to a wide variety of substrate proteins. Sumoylation is involved in the regulation of many cellular pathways, including transcription, DNA repair, chromatin modification and defence to viral infections. Several viruses have connections with sumoylation, either through modification of their own proteins or in changing the sumoylation status of cellular proteins in ways that may be beneficial for infection. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes a widespread reduction in uncharacterized sumoylated cellular protein species, an effect that is caused by one of its key regulatory proteins (ICP0), which also induces the degradation of a number of repressive cellular proteins and thereby stimulates efficient infection. This study describes a comprehensive analysis of cellular proteins whose sumoylation status is altered by HSV-1 infection. Of 877 putative cellular sumoylation substrates, we found 124 whose sumoylation status reduces at least three-fold during infection. We validated the behavior of several such proteins and identified amongst them several novel targets of ICP0 activity with predicted repressive properties.


Vyšlo v časopise: Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection. PLoS Pathog 11(7): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005059
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005059

Souhrn

Proteins are subject to many types of modification that regulate their functions and which are applied after their initial synthesis in the cell. One such modification is known as sumoylation, the covalent linkage of a small ubiquitin-like protein to a wide variety of substrate proteins. Sumoylation is involved in the regulation of many cellular pathways, including transcription, DNA repair, chromatin modification and defence to viral infections. Several viruses have connections with sumoylation, either through modification of their own proteins or in changing the sumoylation status of cellular proteins in ways that may be beneficial for infection. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes a widespread reduction in uncharacterized sumoylated cellular protein species, an effect that is caused by one of its key regulatory proteins (ICP0), which also induces the degradation of a number of repressive cellular proteins and thereby stimulates efficient infection. This study describes a comprehensive analysis of cellular proteins whose sumoylation status is altered by HSV-1 infection. Of 877 putative cellular sumoylation substrates, we found 124 whose sumoylation status reduces at least three-fold during infection. We validated the behavior of several such proteins and identified amongst them several novel targets of ICP0 activity with predicted repressive properties.


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