Selective Recruitment of Nuclear Factors to Productively Replicating Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes


HSV-1 is a human pathogen that infects over 50% of the population. The virus persists as a latent infection in the ganglia of an infected host and upon stressful conditions is reactivated to a lytic state in which it causes recurrent sores at the initial site of infection. During lytic infection, HSV highjacks the host cell to propagate its genome and produce new virus particles. However, there is limited knowledge of what cellular proteins interact with and function on the viral genome. We therefore developed methods to purify viral genomes from productively infected cells to identify associated viral and cellular proteins. We found proteins and protein complexes that have previously been implicated in HSV infection to be enriched on viral genomes, as well as several novel proteins that are likely involved in productive infection. These data provide valuable insight into HSV biology. Furthermore, these methods can be adapted to study other viruses, as well as other aspects of the HSV life cycle.


Vyšlo v časopise: Selective Recruitment of Nuclear Factors to Productively Replicating Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes. PLoS Pathog 11(5): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004939
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004939

Souhrn

HSV-1 is a human pathogen that infects over 50% of the population. The virus persists as a latent infection in the ganglia of an infected host and upon stressful conditions is reactivated to a lytic state in which it causes recurrent sores at the initial site of infection. During lytic infection, HSV highjacks the host cell to propagate its genome and produce new virus particles. However, there is limited knowledge of what cellular proteins interact with and function on the viral genome. We therefore developed methods to purify viral genomes from productively infected cells to identify associated viral and cellular proteins. We found proteins and protein complexes that have previously been implicated in HSV infection to be enriched on viral genomes, as well as several novel proteins that are likely involved in productive infection. These data provide valuable insight into HSV biology. Furthermore, these methods can be adapted to study other viruses, as well as other aspects of the HSV life cycle.


Zdroje

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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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PLOS Pathogens


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