Manipulation of the Xanthophyll Cycle Increases Plant Susceptibility to


In recent years, the role of the chloroplast in the defense against microbes has been intensively investigated and is of high interest to both plant-microbe interaction and photosynthesis research. The xanthophyll cycle is well known to be involved in dissipating excess light energy to protect the photosynthetic apparatus in a process commonly assessed via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Recent studies show that NPQ can be positively or negatively affected by pathogen attack. However, knowledge about the regulatory processes by which pathogens affect NPQ, as well as their impact on plant defense responses, is incomplete. This work characterized the impact of infection of Arabidopsis leaves by the necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on the xanthophyll cycle. Our research revealed for the first time that Sclerotinia uses a novel strategy involving manipulation of the xanthophyll cycle to weaken host defense responses and increase its successful colonization of host cells. These findings contribute to understanding the plant-Sclerotinia interactions in early pathogenesis, which will provide new sights into the development of strategies to increase Sclerotinia resistance in plants for practical applications.


Vyšlo v časopise: Manipulation of the Xanthophyll Cycle Increases Plant Susceptibility to. PLoS Pathog 11(5): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004878
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004878

Souhrn

In recent years, the role of the chloroplast in the defense against microbes has been intensively investigated and is of high interest to both plant-microbe interaction and photosynthesis research. The xanthophyll cycle is well known to be involved in dissipating excess light energy to protect the photosynthetic apparatus in a process commonly assessed via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Recent studies show that NPQ can be positively or negatively affected by pathogen attack. However, knowledge about the regulatory processes by which pathogens affect NPQ, as well as their impact on plant defense responses, is incomplete. This work characterized the impact of infection of Arabidopsis leaves by the necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on the xanthophyll cycle. Our research revealed for the first time that Sclerotinia uses a novel strategy involving manipulation of the xanthophyll cycle to weaken host defense responses and increase its successful colonization of host cells. These findings contribute to understanding the plant-Sclerotinia interactions in early pathogenesis, which will provide new sights into the development of strategies to increase Sclerotinia resistance in plants for practical applications.


Zdroje

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