Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria


Why do some malaria-infected children develop severe and lethal forms of the disease, while others only have mild forms? In order to try to find potential answers or clues to this question, we have here analyzed more than 1,000 different human proteins in the blood of more than 500 malaria-infected children from Ibadan in Nigeria, a holoendemic malaria region. We identified several proteins that were present at higher levels in the blood from the children that developed severe malaria in comparison to those that did not. Some of the most interesting identified proteins were muscle specific proteins, which indicate that damaged muscles could be a discriminatory pathologic event in cerebral malaria compared to other malaria cases. These findings will hopefully lead to an increased understanding of the disease and may contribute to the development of clinical algorithms that could predict which children are more at risks to severe malaria. This in turn will be of high value in the management of these children in already overloaded tertiary-care health facilities in urban large densely-populated sub-Saharan cities with holoendemic malaria such as in the case of Ibadan and Lagos.


Vyšlo v časopise: Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria. PLoS Pathog 10(4): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004038
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004038

Souhrn

Why do some malaria-infected children develop severe and lethal forms of the disease, while others only have mild forms? In order to try to find potential answers or clues to this question, we have here analyzed more than 1,000 different human proteins in the blood of more than 500 malaria-infected children from Ibadan in Nigeria, a holoendemic malaria region. We identified several proteins that were present at higher levels in the blood from the children that developed severe malaria in comparison to those that did not. Some of the most interesting identified proteins were muscle specific proteins, which indicate that damaged muscles could be a discriminatory pathologic event in cerebral malaria compared to other malaria cases. These findings will hopefully lead to an increased understanding of the disease and may contribute to the development of clinical algorithms that could predict which children are more at risks to severe malaria. This in turn will be of high value in the management of these children in already overloaded tertiary-care health facilities in urban large densely-populated sub-Saharan cities with holoendemic malaria such as in the case of Ibadan and Lagos.


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