Lack of Detectable HIV-1 Molecular Evolution during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy


Anti-HIV compounds are highly effective for preventing the onset of AIDS but they do not cure infected individuals. Very low levels of virus remain detectable in the blood of most patients despite antiviral treatment and levels surge if treatment is stopped. It is crucial to understand why current treatments are not equipped to cure HIV infection so that new therapies addressing these shortcomings can be developed. By characterizing genetic sequences of HIV in patients before and during antiviral treatment, we found that the low levels of virus detected in the blood of treated patients did not result from newly infected cells but originated from cells, or the daughters of cells, that were already infected when treatment was initiated. This finding demonstrates that HIV present in blood after prolonged antiviral treatment is derived from cells infected prior to treatment which likely expanded over time through cell division. Such long lived, infected cells are likely the critical target for developing strategies to cure HIV infection.


Vyšlo v časopise: Lack of Detectable HIV-1 Molecular Evolution during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy. PLoS Pathog 10(3): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004010
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004010

Souhrn

Anti-HIV compounds are highly effective for preventing the onset of AIDS but they do not cure infected individuals. Very low levels of virus remain detectable in the blood of most patients despite antiviral treatment and levels surge if treatment is stopped. It is crucial to understand why current treatments are not equipped to cure HIV infection so that new therapies addressing these shortcomings can be developed. By characterizing genetic sequences of HIV in patients before and during antiviral treatment, we found that the low levels of virus detected in the blood of treated patients did not result from newly infected cells but originated from cells, or the daughters of cells, that were already infected when treatment was initiated. This finding demonstrates that HIV present in blood after prolonged antiviral treatment is derived from cells infected prior to treatment which likely expanded over time through cell division. Such long lived, infected cells are likely the critical target for developing strategies to cure HIV infection.


Zdroje

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Štítky
Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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