and Exhibit Metabolic Symbioses


Unlike the traditional view that most diseases are caused by infection with a single bacterial species, some chronic diseases including periodontitis result from the perturbation of the natural microbiota and the proliferation of a number of opportunistic pathogens. Both Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola have been associated with the progression and severity of chronic periodontitis and have been shown to display synergistic virulence in animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms to these observations are unclear. Here we demonstrate that these two bacteria grow synergistically in continuous co-culture and modify their gene expression. The expression of T. denticola genes encoding known virulence factors and enzymes involved in the uptake and metabolism of the amino acid glycine was up-regulated in co-culture. T. denticola stimulated the proteolytic P. gingivalis to produce free glycine, which T. denticola used as a major carbon source. Our study shows P. gingivalis and T. denticola co-operate metabolically and this helps to explain their synergistic virulence in animal models and their intimate association in vivo.


Vyšlo v časopise: and Exhibit Metabolic Symbioses. PLoS Pathog 10(3): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003955
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003955

Souhrn

Unlike the traditional view that most diseases are caused by infection with a single bacterial species, some chronic diseases including periodontitis result from the perturbation of the natural microbiota and the proliferation of a number of opportunistic pathogens. Both Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola have been associated with the progression and severity of chronic periodontitis and have been shown to display synergistic virulence in animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms to these observations are unclear. Here we demonstrate that these two bacteria grow synergistically in continuous co-culture and modify their gene expression. The expression of T. denticola genes encoding known virulence factors and enzymes involved in the uptake and metabolism of the amino acid glycine was up-regulated in co-culture. T. denticola stimulated the proteolytic P. gingivalis to produce free glycine, which T. denticola used as a major carbon source. Our study shows P. gingivalis and T. denticola co-operate metabolically and this helps to explain their synergistic virulence in animal models and their intimate association in vivo.


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