The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering


Cells are the building blocks of our bodies. How do cells rearrange to form three-dimensional body plans and maintain specific tissue structures? Specialized adhesion molecules on the cell surface mediate attachment between cells and their surrounding environment to hold tissues together. Our work uses the developing fruit fly embryo to demonstrate how such connections are regulated during tissue growth. Since the genes and molecules involved in this process are highly similar between flies and humans, we can also apply our findings to our understanding of how human tissues form and are maintained. We observe that, in late developing muscles, clusters of cell adhesion molecules concentrate together to create stronger attachments between muscle cells and tendon cells. This strengthening mechanism allows the fruit fly to accommodate increasing amounts of force imposed by larger, more active muscles. We identify specific genetic mutations that disrupt these strengthening mechanisms and lead to severe developmental defects during fly development. Our results illustrate how subtle fine-tuning of the connections between cells and their surrounding environment is important to form and maintain normal tissue structure across the animal kingdom.


Vyšlo v časopise: The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering. PLoS Genet 10(11): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004756
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004756

Souhrn

Cells are the building blocks of our bodies. How do cells rearrange to form three-dimensional body plans and maintain specific tissue structures? Specialized adhesion molecules on the cell surface mediate attachment between cells and their surrounding environment to hold tissues together. Our work uses the developing fruit fly embryo to demonstrate how such connections are regulated during tissue growth. Since the genes and molecules involved in this process are highly similar between flies and humans, we can also apply our findings to our understanding of how human tissues form and are maintained. We observe that, in late developing muscles, clusters of cell adhesion molecules concentrate together to create stronger attachments between muscle cells and tendon cells. This strengthening mechanism allows the fruit fly to accommodate increasing amounts of force imposed by larger, more active muscles. We identify specific genetic mutations that disrupt these strengthening mechanisms and lead to severe developmental defects during fly development. Our results illustrate how subtle fine-tuning of the connections between cells and their surrounding environment is important to form and maintain normal tissue structure across the animal kingdom.


Zdroje

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