Widespread Reassortment Shapes the Evolution and Epidemiology of Bluetongue Virus following European Invasion


Segmented viruses have genomes that are separated into multiple segments, comparable to chromosomes in higher organisms. When two segmented viruses of the same species infect the same cell, their progeny may incorporate segments picked up from the “parental” viruses. This process is called “reassortment” and represents an important way for segmented viruses to evolve. Whereas reassortment has received a lot of attention in certain segmented viruses, especially influenza A, its frequency and biological consequences remain poorly understood for most of the others. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the reassortment patterns in bluetongue virus, an important pathogen of livestock, during its repeated emergence in Europe in recent decades. We confirm earlier reports that reassortment is common and can involve segments derived from live vaccines used to control outbreaks. However, the mixing of viral genomes is not strictly random and reassortment is commonly followed by novel adaptive changes in the progeny virus. This points to important functional links (paired associations) between certain segments. Our findings have important implications for the classification and control of segmented viruses and generate new insights and hypotheses about the biological interactions among different parts of the bluetongue virus genome.


Vyšlo v časopise: Widespread Reassortment Shapes the Evolution and Epidemiology of Bluetongue Virus following European Invasion. PLoS Pathog 11(8): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005056
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005056

Souhrn

Segmented viruses have genomes that are separated into multiple segments, comparable to chromosomes in higher organisms. When two segmented viruses of the same species infect the same cell, their progeny may incorporate segments picked up from the “parental” viruses. This process is called “reassortment” and represents an important way for segmented viruses to evolve. Whereas reassortment has received a lot of attention in certain segmented viruses, especially influenza A, its frequency and biological consequences remain poorly understood for most of the others. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the reassortment patterns in bluetongue virus, an important pathogen of livestock, during its repeated emergence in Europe in recent decades. We confirm earlier reports that reassortment is common and can involve segments derived from live vaccines used to control outbreaks. However, the mixing of viral genomes is not strictly random and reassortment is commonly followed by novel adaptive changes in the progeny virus. This points to important functional links (paired associations) between certain segments. Our findings have important implications for the classification and control of segmented viruses and generate new insights and hypotheses about the biological interactions among different parts of the bluetongue virus genome.


Zdroje

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