Diverse Host-Seeking Behaviors of Skin-Penetrating Nematodes


Parasitic worms are a significant public health problem. Skin-penetrating worms such as hookworms and the human threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis dwell in the soil before infecting their host. However, how they locate and identify appropriate hosts is not understood. Here we investigated the host-seeking behavior of Str. stercoralis. We found that Str. stercoralis moves quickly and actively searches for hosts to infect. We also found that Str. stercoralis is attracted to human skin and sweat odorants, including many that also attract mosquitoes. We then compared olfactory behavior across parasitic worm species and found that parasites with similar hosts respond similarly to odorants even when they are not closely related, suggesting parasitic worms use olfactory cues to select hosts. A better understanding of host seeking in skin-penetrating worms may lead to novel control strategies.


Vyšlo v časopise: Diverse Host-Seeking Behaviors of Skin-Penetrating Nematodes. PLoS Pathog 10(8): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004305
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004305

Souhrn

Parasitic worms are a significant public health problem. Skin-penetrating worms such as hookworms and the human threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis dwell in the soil before infecting their host. However, how they locate and identify appropriate hosts is not understood. Here we investigated the host-seeking behavior of Str. stercoralis. We found that Str. stercoralis moves quickly and actively searches for hosts to infect. We also found that Str. stercoralis is attracted to human skin and sweat odorants, including many that also attract mosquitoes. We then compared olfactory behavior across parasitic worm species and found that parasites with similar hosts respond similarly to odorants even when they are not closely related, suggesting parasitic worms use olfactory cues to select hosts. A better understanding of host seeking in skin-penetrating worms may lead to novel control strategies.


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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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