Adoptive Transfer of EBV Specific CD8 T Cell Clones Can Transiently Control EBV Infection in Humanized Mice


Epstein Barr virus persistently infects more than 90% of the human adult population. While fortunately carried as an asymptomatic chronic infection in most individuals, it causes B cell lymphomas and carcinomas in some patients. Symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis, predisposes for some of these malignancies and is characterized by massive expansions of cytotoxic T cells, which are mostly directed against lytic EBV antigens that are expressed during virus particle production. Therefore, we investigated the protective role of lytic EBV antigen specific T cells during EBV infection and the contribution of lytic EBV infection to virus-associated tumor formation. We found that lytic EBV antigen specific T cells kill B cells with lytic virus replication and might thereby transiently control EBV infection in mice with human immune system components. Furthermore, we observed that EBV associated B cell tumors outside secondary lymphoid organs may require lytic replication for efficient formation. Thus, we suggest that lytic EBV antigens should be explored for vaccination against symptomatic EBV infection and EBV associated extra-lymphoid tumors.


Vyšlo v časopise: Adoptive Transfer of EBV Specific CD8 T Cell Clones Can Transiently Control EBV Infection in Humanized Mice. PLoS Pathog 10(8): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004333
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004333

Souhrn

Epstein Barr virus persistently infects more than 90% of the human adult population. While fortunately carried as an asymptomatic chronic infection in most individuals, it causes B cell lymphomas and carcinomas in some patients. Symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis, predisposes for some of these malignancies and is characterized by massive expansions of cytotoxic T cells, which are mostly directed against lytic EBV antigens that are expressed during virus particle production. Therefore, we investigated the protective role of lytic EBV antigen specific T cells during EBV infection and the contribution of lytic EBV infection to virus-associated tumor formation. We found that lytic EBV antigen specific T cells kill B cells with lytic virus replication and might thereby transiently control EBV infection in mice with human immune system components. Furthermore, we observed that EBV associated B cell tumors outside secondary lymphoid organs may require lytic replication for efficient formation. Thus, we suggest that lytic EBV antigens should be explored for vaccination against symptomatic EBV infection and EBV associated extra-lymphoid tumors.


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Hygiena a epidemiológia Infekčné lekárstvo Laboratórium

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