Preferential Use of Central Metabolism Reveals a Nutritional Basis for Polymicrobial Infection


The human urinary tract is a leading source for polymicrobial infections and for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Treating these potentially dangerous infections have recently become more challenging due to the appearance of uropathogenic strains that are resistant to the many of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. The majority of urinary tract infections (UTI) are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more likely to cause catheter-associated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent nutritional requirements despite growing in the same host environment. This result indicates that E. coli and P. mirabilis do not directly compete for nutrients during UTI. Indeed, we found that persistence of both pathogens is enhanced when they co-colonize the host. This work represents an important step toward understanding the basic nutritional requirements for two major pathogens that cause UTI and shows how mixed infections can change these requirements. Understanding how bacteria grow during infections is fundamental to ultimately uncover new ways to combat increasingly drug-resistant bacterial infections.


Vyšlo v časopise: Preferential Use of Central Metabolism Reveals a Nutritional Basis for Polymicrobial Infection. PLoS Pathog 11(1): e32767. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004601
Kategorie: Research Article
prolekare.web.journal.doi_sk: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004601

Souhrn

The human urinary tract is a leading source for polymicrobial infections and for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Treating these potentially dangerous infections have recently become more challenging due to the appearance of uropathogenic strains that are resistant to the many of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. The majority of urinary tract infections (UTI) are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more likely to cause catheter-associated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent nutritional requirements despite growing in the same host environment. This result indicates that E. coli and P. mirabilis do not directly compete for nutrients during UTI. Indeed, we found that persistence of both pathogens is enhanced when they co-colonize the host. This work represents an important step toward understanding the basic nutritional requirements for two major pathogens that cause UTI and shows how mixed infections can change these requirements. Understanding how bacteria grow during infections is fundamental to ultimately uncover new ways to combat increasingly drug-resistant bacterial infections.


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