MODELING OF THE CHEMICAL STAGE OF RADIOBIOLOGICAL MECHANISM USING PETRI NETS


The biological effect of ionizing particles is caused mainly by water radicals being formed by densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particles during physical stage; only greater radical clusters being efficient in DNA molecule damaging. The given clusters diffuse after their formation and the radical concentration changes also by reactions running mutually or with other substances being present in corresponding clusters. The damage effect depends then on radical concentrations at a time when the cluster meets a DNA molecule. The influence of oxygen may be important (mainly in the case of low-LET radiation) because oxygen is always present in living cells. Oxygen may act then in two different directions: at small concentrations the interaction with hydrogen radicals prevails and final biological effect diminishes while at higher concentrations additional efficient oxygen radicals may be formed. The time evolution of changing radical concentrations during cluster diffusion may be modeled and analyzed well with the help of Continuous Petri nets.

Keywords:
Radiobiological mechanism, chemical phase, DSB formation, Petri nets


Autoři: J. Barilla 1;  M. V. Lokajíček 2;  H. Pisaková 2;  P. Simr 1
Působiště autorů: J. E. Purkinje University in Usti nad Labem, Faculty of Science 1;  Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 2
Vyšlo v časopise: Lékař a technika - Clinician and Technology No. 2, 2015, 45, 53-60
Kategorie: Původní práce

Souhrn

The biological effect of ionizing particles is caused mainly by water radicals being formed by densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particles during physical stage; only greater radical clusters being efficient in DNA molecule damaging. The given clusters diffuse after their formation and the radical concentration changes also by reactions running mutually or with other substances being present in corresponding clusters. The damage effect depends then on radical concentrations at a time when the cluster meets a DNA molecule. The influence of oxygen may be important (mainly in the case of low-LET radiation) because oxygen is always present in living cells. Oxygen may act then in two different directions: at small concentrations the interaction with hydrogen radicals prevails and final biological effect diminishes while at higher concentrations additional efficient oxygen radicals may be formed. The time evolution of changing radical concentrations during cluster diffusion may be modeled and analyzed well with the help of Continuous Petri nets.

Keywords:
Radiobiological mechanism, chemical phase, DSB formation, Petri nets


Zdroje

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Biomedicína
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